Poetry Appreciation: ‘Marrying the Hangman’ by Margaret Atwood

Hello! I have decided to add a segment called Poetry Appreciation to my blog. What does this mean? This basically means that every once in a while I will share a poem that I like. Today I've chosen Margaret Atwood's 'Marrying the Hangman'. About Margaret Atwood: Margaret Atwood is a Canadian poet, novelist, teacher, essayist, … Continue reading Poetry Appreciation: ‘Marrying the Hangman’ by Margaret Atwood

Wuthering Heights: Exploring Heathcliff’s Darkness

Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights (1847) is a tale of tragedy and revenge. Heathcliff, one of the prime characters of the novel, lies at the centre of the tragedy and is the perpetrator of the revenge. His deeds leave no doubt that he is violent, abusive, and cruel. What intrigues me the most about Heathcliff in … Continue reading Wuthering Heights: Exploring Heathcliff’s Darkness

To The Lighthouse: Of Time and Narratives

Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse (1927) is a modernist literary classic. One of my favourite things about Woolf's works, and about this novel, in particular, is her use of Stream of Consciousness narrative technique and her treatment of time within it: her art of making one day span over a hundred pages and compress ten … Continue reading To The Lighthouse: Of Time and Narratives

The Search For Meaning in Ionesco’s The Chairs

Absurdist theatre is known for subverting logic and for being, well, absurd. The Chairs is one such play. An absurdist "tragic farce", this play was written by Eugene Ionesco in 1952 and first performed in the same year. The play revolves around an old married couple who live in a house that is surrounded by … Continue reading The Search For Meaning in Ionesco’s The Chairs

‘The Yellow Wallpaper’: Reclaiming Control

Charlotte Perkins Gilman's short story 'The Yellow Wallpaper' first came out in 1892. It offers a sharp critique of the 19th century White American Patriarchal Bourgeois Society by reclaiming the narrative of hysteria that had been used to oppress women and their voices for a long time. This story is one of a woman with … Continue reading ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’: Reclaiming Control

Godot in Times of Coronavirus

"Nothing happens, nobody comes, nobody goes, it's awful!". These are lines from Samuel Beckett's Waiting For Godot and I think that they summarise the current times perfectly. Waiting For Godot was written in a post World War Two world where alienation and despair among people were high and existential angst was a part of life. The play embodies these … Continue reading Godot in Times of Coronavirus

Pride and Prejudice: A Nineteenth-Century Fairy-tale

Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is an iconic novel. Throughout the years, multiple editions have been published, it has been adapted, and several writers have attempted at sequels such as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Death at Pemberley. It is, therefore, very evident that Pride and Prejudice has had a mass cultural impact that … Continue reading Pride and Prejudice: A Nineteenth-Century Fairy-tale